Bamboo DiRT: Digital Tools for Digital Humanists

UPDATE: Since I posted this BambooDIRT has been updated with a new website and logo. Same functionality and top notch curating, however.

There are a huge number of digital tools for digital humanists to sink their teeth into (see for example my post on “Digital Humanities research resources you should know about“). It is unfortunate that–and I am sure I am not alone in this–it is often only through serendipity that you come across them.

Sometimes, sadly, serendipity is rather slow working and slightly slap-dash in her delivery. That is why I am rather excited to have bumped into the Bamboo DiRT site. The site describes itself as a “registry of digital research tools for scholarly use” and it certainly include a large number of excellent digital tools for humanities scholars to take advantage of. (more…)

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UPDATED: 23 Digital Humanities research resources you should know about

UPDATED on 8 July 2014: I have added a few new resources to the “Multiple Resources” and “Newspapers and Periodicals” sections.

I will be using this page to include any references to online resources and databases that I come across in my research and which I think are useful. This will updated as and when I (or indeed you) come across anything new.

If you have any contributions you think should be included either leave a comment or contact me directly either through the comments section or by email through the contact page. (more…)

TALK in Cardiff: "Shedding new light on Alfred Russel Wallace’s insect specimens" by Dr George Beccaloni

Do you want to know more about Alfred Russel Wallace and his entomological collections? If so, you’re in luck.

The entomologist and Director of the Wallace Fund, Dr George Beccaloni, is to deliver a paper entitled: “Shedding new light on Alfred Russel Wallace’s insect specimens” in Cardiff on 25 June 2014. Here is the abstract:

Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913) is best known as being the co-discoverer of evolution by natural selection and the ‘father’ of zoogeography, however, he was also one of the greatest collectors of tropical insects and other animals of the 19th century. Wallace collected specimens for his private collection and also on a commercial basis for four years in Brazil and eight years in South-East Asia (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and East Timor). During the latter expedition he shipped back almost 110,000 insects to the UK, many of which were species new to science. My talk will give an overview of the insect specimens Wallace collected and where they are now. I will also discuss how my study of his data labels and collecting notebooks (recently digitised as part of the Wallace Correspondence Project) has shed new light on where and when the specimens were collected, adding much to their scientific value.

(more…)

BAVS Annual Conference on "Victorian Sustainability" opens for registration

The British Association for Victorian Studies has opened (from 15 June) registration for its annual conference.

This year it is on “Victorian Sustainability” and will be held at the University of Kent in Canterbury from 4 to 6 September 2014.
As their call for papers explained:

From emerging ideas about the perils of environmental degradation to the establishment of the National Trust, the concept of sustainability began to take on a new importance in the Victorian period that remains relevant in 21st-century modernity.

Full registration is £285 and student registration is £215.

This price includes access to the conference on all three days, lunch and refreshments on each day, 2 nights accommodation on Thursday and Friday, evening meal on Thursday 4th September and the conference dinner on Friday 5th September.

Visit the BAVS Annual Conference registration site to book your place.

Finding 50 Years of "Punch; or, the London Charivari" Digital Archives

One of my favourite 19th and 20th century publications is the satirical magazine Punch. However, it is often hard to find the volumes for the magazine despite the fact that most are available somewhere online. As a result, I have tried to compile a list of the volumes I have found over time.

Currently I have only compiled them for the period to which I am chiefly concerned (from 1870 to 1919). However, if I have time or the inclination this may well expand. (more…)

TALK in Croydon: "Alfred Russel Wallace as Social Reformer" by Prof. David Stack on 26 June 2014

There is a talk being given in Croydon on 26 June 2014 by Prof. David Stack on the University of Reading on “Alfred Russel Wallace as Social Reformer”. The abstract reads:

South Croydonian Alfred Russel Wallace developed a theory of evolution but was beaten into print by Charles Darwin. As well as a leading scientist he was an active social reformer on issues like land nationalisation and anti-smallpox vaccination. Prof. Stack will discuss Wallace as social reformer.

Wallace lived in Croydon from March 1878 to 5 May 1881, first on Duppas Hill Lane and then St Peter’s Road.  During this period he developed his interest in Land Nationalisation and co-founded and was the inaugural president of the Land Nationalisation Society.
(more…)

Getting Your Academic Work Published

On 5 June 2014 I attended the “Getting Grants, Getting Published and Staying Sane: Life After the PhD” event at the Institute of Historical Research at the University of London organised by HistoryLab+. Links to the full “series” can be found here.


The bread and butter work of the academic world is undoubtedly the publication of research. Consequently, appreciation of the challenges and opportunities available to PhD students after their graduation is important. Emma Brennan, Barry Doyle and Jane Winters explored this important area in session 3. (more…)

Transcription Help: Can you read this 1 word in a John Lindley (1799-1865) letter?

As part of my work on Alfred Russel Wallace and his introduction to botanical study, I had to go to the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge (SDUK) archives held by University College London (though currently housed at the National Archives).

There I wanted to look at the correspondence with the SDUK of the botanist and inaugural Professor of Botany at UCL, John Lindley (1799-1865),  to see if it threw up anything interesting for my research. This it certainly did. (more…)

Getting Your Academic Work Published

On 5 June 2014 I attended the “Getting Grants, Getting Published and Staying Sane: Life After the PhD” event at the Institute of Historical Research at the University of London organised by HistoryLab+. Links to the full “series” can be found here.

The bread and butter work of the academic world is undoubtedly the publication of research. Consequently, appreciation of the challenges and opportunities available to PhD students after their graduation is important. Emma Brennan, Barry Doyle and Jane Winters explored this important area in session 3. (more…)

BSHS Masters Bursaries: Four awards for £4,000 available for History of Science Students

The British Society for the History of Science has announced that they have opened the competition for four bursaries they have for masters students in the History of Science. The deadline is 30 June 2014.

The bursaries are worth £4,000 each and are available for students who are starting their Masters programme this academic year coming (i.e. 2014/15). The details are:

Applicants must have a confirmed place on a master’s programme in the United Kingdom or the Republic of Ireland. Those studying for research-based master’s degrees are eligible to apply, but not PhD students nominally registered for MPhil (or similar) provisionally pending upgrade to PhD registration. There is no nationality requirement for applicants, or an age limit. Non-members of the Society are welcome to apply.

Although they say that non-members are welcome to apply, I would strongly encourage anyone to join the society. It is an extremely active society and publishes the British Journal for the History of Science.* That being said, if you’re successful you get a year’s membership bundled in too as well as free registration to the BSHS Postgraduate Conference.

More details on how to apply can be found on the BSHS website. Good luck to anyone who is applying.

Notes

*See my posts on my book reviews published in the BJHS for June and December 2013